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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> a
outside the presidential palace. egyptian president mohamed morsi is calling for a national dialogue but is resolute about his controversial constitution. nbc's ayman mohyeldin is joining us live from cairo monitoring the situation. let's start with egypt. how much more trouble is morsi in there? >> reporter: well, he's definitely politically isolated because all of egypt's major political factions have really come out against him for both the constitutional decree that gave him absolute powers nearly two weeks ago and kicked off all of these protests, but more importantly, they're very upset with him that he's trying to ram home this constitution that was drafted by an assembly made up mostly of islamist parties loyal to the president within just two weeks. so, that's fueled a lot of the street anger, left six people killed. it also brought out the military outside of the presidential palace. today, the opposition is calling for another million man march. no doubt, though, that the president's politically isolated and under mounting public pressure. mika? >> let's go back to syria.
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
to overthrow his government. mohammed morsi is calling for a national dialogue with the opposition this weekend. he also accused some opposition members working with mubarak regime. potential for more death in syria on a larger scale is growing tonight. chief washington correspondent james rosen has disturbing news about weapons of mass destructions. >> a regime helicopter calltured in the skies above syria in the unverified amateur video unloadss something. likely a defensive flare. but the moment epitomizes the threat of nuclear weapons that the syrian people now live. rebel forces are now taking the fight directly to the assad regime inside the capital damascus with a deadly explosion near the arab red crescent building and pitch battles for key airfields outside the city. >> it is clear regime forces are being grounded down and they are losing. >> president bashar assad already killed estimated 40,000 people. president obama top aids will fear the fighting take on gruesome character. >> we remained very concerned. very concerned. as the opposition advances on damascus. that the regime might
supporters of president mohammed morsi, the muslim brotherhood, camed -- claimed victory in the first round of voting on morsi's draft constitution. this took place over the weekend. greg palkot streaming live from key owe egypt. greg? >> reporter: hey, jon, yeah. folks are a little bit on edge off voting over the weekend on the draft constitution. the results were closer than expected. the yes votes were 57%. no, 43%. the turnout was lower than usual. according to the opposition the vote was marched by maured by widespread irregularitis. opposition attacking opposition headquarters here in cairo. all that is prompting again by government critics who called for more protests on tuesday, in front. presidential palace in tahrir square behind me and up to the u.s. embassy. this is up to the second and final round of voting in rural areas of egypt on saturday for the constitution which is favored by egyptian president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood party. critics say it is too islamist. defenders say it is necessary to preserve stability here in this country. analysts are saying they
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)